AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, left, participates in a conversation with 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Ann Claire Williams at Roosevelt University Monday night. 
Posted September 12, 2017 2:31 PM
   

Ginsburg laments partisanship before Chicago crowd

By Sophia Tareen
Associated Press writer

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg told a crowd at Roosevelt University Monday that she’ll remain on the nation’s highest court as long as she can work at “full steam.”

The 84-year-old briefly addressed her tenure during the opening event of a Roosevelt conference that largely focused on personal stories about her family, early legal career, the women’s moment and her status as a pop culture icon.

“There’s work to be done,” she told the receptive audience. “I will remain to do it as long as I have full steam.”

Ginsburg was appointed to the high court in 1993 by then-President Bill Clinton.

She didn’t discuss current cases before the court, but said the confirmation process for justices has become too partisan, which is “very dangerous” for a judiciary.

She said a spirit of bipartisanship that prevailed in 1980s and 1990s with voting across party lines has failed recently and hopes Congress will stop the “nonsense” in her lifetime.

When asked how she’s worked alongside justices with whom she disagrees, Ginsburg said it’s simple: “We revere the institution for which we work.”

The event took on a festive atmosphere with standing ovations and loud cheers.

One young girl dressed as Wonder Woman. Two women wore T-shirts featuring all three female Supreme Court justices with the caption “Squad Goals.”

Ginsburg’s image has become popular recently, especially after a New York University law student upset about a 2013 decision striking down part of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 created an online post citing Ginsburg’s dissent and dubbing her the “Notorious RBG,” playing off the reputation of rapper the Notorious B.I.G.

Ginsburg joked about the comparison, saying their similarities were obvious.

“We were both born and bred in Brooklyn, New York,” she said.

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